What businesses must know about access control in 2017

Businesses have had to expand and change their operations in dramatic ways in 2016. No one could’ve predicted the various major global shifts that upended the markets. Donald Trump became President-Elect of the United States, troubling many people over the world due to his lack of experience, his horrendous proclamations and his incomprehensible statements. Many did not believe such a person would ever find themselves in the White House. Similarly, no one believed that the British referendum concerning Britain leaving the European Union would be an issue – and, yet, the majority of voters (51.9%) opted to leave (resulting in what’s now known as Brexit). All this has radically changed foreign investment and how businesses will now interact with businesses in these two regions. But another issue has radically made businesses rethink their approach to operations: cybersecurity. Combining all of these has meant that businesses are now approaching 2017 in a new light and it’s worth considering what this means.

Why cybersecurity became a threat in 2016

According to American intelligence agencies, there is little doubt Russian hackers affected the recent US Presidential Election. As Reuters reports:

“James Clapper, the director of national intelligence, said he had a very high level of confidence that Russia hacked Democratic Party and campaign staff email, and disseminated propaganda and fake news aimed at the Nov. 8 election.”

This comes in light of various high level security agencies finding themselves vulnerable to attacks from foreign operators. Indeed, even as high a level as the Joint Chiefs were the victims of hackers, who got into their database.

But it wasn’t only state departments and the military that were targeted. Major corporations like Sony and Yahoo were the targets of various breaches. For Sony, this meant private documents and photographs were released, especially of celebrities. Yahoo found its users’ details were open for theft, which could’ve resulted in identity theft given how little is required to carry out such a crime.

Businesses began taking more aggressive steps to protect themselves and their business. In offices around the world, the password policy began changing – new, improved ways to create a password were used instead of basic, easy-to-hack alternatives.

Cybersecurity ties into bigger concerns about security in general. As Small Business Computing notes:

“A recent study on cloud security—conducted by Forrester Consulting and commissioned by Alert Logic—found that nearly 80 percent of participants saw value in outside security expertise to supplement their security operations. Market-leading security technologies are critical but the best approach to keeping sensitive data—both yours and your customers’—secure, involves a ‘products and services’ approach. This combines cybersecurity technologies with 24×7 security-monitoring by a team of security and compliance experts.”

This itself ties into access control.

What is access control?

People should not have access to everything, at all times, everywhere. Whether it’s because you need to limit customers’ access to stock or not allow staff to use certain data, access control is essential for business.

Various physical barriers are already used often by businesses, such as with man traps. This is, as the name highlights, restricting of individual’s movements. It’s an entire physical barrier that stops people moving into certain areas. As Data Center Journal summarises:

“This “trap” enables security – whether a system or an employee – to verify the credentials of the entrant and either allow access or trigger alerts indicating an unauthorized entry attempt. Mantraps, which are sometimes called security vestibules, are small rooms with two or more doors. Authentication procedures may be required either at just the door to the secure area or at all doors.”

The most common version is simply using two doors, within the secure space. The first door allows a person to enter, then once closed, allows security verification. Then the second door can open once the first is closed and the person has been cleared. This helps slow down entrance into a secure area and ascertains the person is allowed to enter.  

This goes further when you focus on the digital sphere. As Tech Target notes:

“Access control is a security technique that can be used to regulate who or what can view or use resources in a computing environment. There are two main types of access control: physical and logical. Physical access control limits access to campuses, buildings, rooms and physical IT assets. Logical access limits connections to computer networks, system files and data.”

Cybersecurity doesn’t only involve the digital sphere. Physical access itself has ramifications on this. To that end, restricting physical access is also essential. By acting in these aggressive ways, businesses can better prepare themselves for the coming year and a whole host of new dangers it will present. If hackers are targeting the highest offices in America, their biggest, most tech savvy corporations, you can bet they won’t relent when it comes to ordinary people. Considering the average person also loses out when businesses fail, everyone benefits from having increased security measures.