Tag Archives: marketing

Tips to stay ahead in today’s world

Businesses must be faster and yet more accurate than ever before. With rolling news that never stops, constant sources of information and a wealth of knowledge at our fingertips, all businesses should be rethinking how they operate. There’s no point in business people ignoring progress, even if it has resulted in them feeling overwhelmed. If we don’t keep up, we’ll either be left behind or swept aside by those able to ride the currents.

We should therefore consider the various ways we can use tech to help us stay ahead.

Use Social Media

One often overlooked area businesses must consider is social media. Though each platform is different, each caters to particular needs and audiences. For example, Twitter is ideal for short, instant messages that many will read quickly. Tweets are easily shareable and, recently, can contain various forms of media: videos, static and moving images.

Facebook allows for longer posts and tends to mean a more engaged experience, as clients write directly on our pages and accounts. With other tools, like Facebook Live, we can also create relevant, longer content.

Aside from marketing, social media can act as a source of business, industry and market news. Considering how quickly information is distributed, this can help us stay on top of what’s happening in our field and those related to us.

Be ready to upgrade

All sorts of equipment can quickly become outdated. For example, computers stop receiving software support. This means they can no longer run the latest versions of important software clients might use. We must be willing to upgrade where necessary, meaning we should have money put aside specifically to upgrade the tools we use everyday.

Upskill staff

Be sure to carve out time for staff to improve themselves. This keeps them abreast of information and where the market is going. They improve their own skills, meaning they become more valuable in general and specifically for us. We’re therefore investing. In this way, we have staff who are constantly keeping their heads above the water.

(Picture credit: unsplash / Pexels)

What lies in the future of marketing?

No one can accurately predict the future. Yet we can speculate on broader themes and examine what happened in the past. Making informed predictions does not mean absolutely perfect ones. To that end, we should wonder what lies ahead for marketing. Knowing what we’ll see means knowing what will work – and in this way, we benefit our business.

Social is king

Social media has come to dominate the modern landscape, with smartphone users. Even on the African continent, where mobile phone users outnumber even bank users, social media is rapidly spreading. Of course, social media is completely different than other forms of media since it is controlled by the audience itself. That is, they decide what to see but can then interact with major brands like never before.

This isn’t like an audience who could change the channel – on Twitter, Facebook and so on – users and brands can often operate on the same platform and have the same reach. As Inc.com notes:

“The social approach underscores the importance of the increasingly connected, interactive and vocal audience dominant in social networks. With increasing power over the kind of content they produce and consume, users are becoming more discerning. The mass market approach is thus no longer as relevant as before.”

Recognising the growth of social media is essential for any brands hoping to dominate or have some strong footing in marketing. Creating or working with a tech-savvy, socially capable marketing team is essential.

Mobile will dominate

Related to social media, mobile marketing will also continue to be important. What’s important is to recognise what technology is being used for. For example, SMS messages are no longer as prominent as they once were. This means if we’re still sending SMSes in 2017, we might look as relevant as VCR repair people.

But there’s another often overlooked aspect. As Internet Retailer highlights: “The more screens a shopper uses to access an online retailer, the more loyal and valuable she is.”

Good content

Customers want more than just what the business offers, in terms of products or services. They want an experience. One way to deliver that is to produce relevant content, tapping into wider social events and happenings. We want customers to feel they are dealing with people, not just a blank name or logo. By showing humanity, in terms of keeping up with social events, movements, thought leadership, we provide more ways for them to interact with us.

These are just some considerations for the future, but we should also keep up to date by doing marketing courses, providing us with more concrete foundations for consideration.  

Ads on bikes: The new spaces for marketing

Most of us would not consider a bicycle an ideal space to put an advert. Yet, that’s precisely what one business did. As BikeBiz reports:

“A start-up tech firm wants to pay cyclists to pedal – the cyclists’ bikes will be equipped with LCD screens that carry adverts. Because the screens are equipped with GPS chips they could be triggered by geographical locations. So, Londoners could be alerted to an Evans sale when the cyclist-with-a-screen passes close to an Evans store.”

This unique approach to marketing benefits by being flexible and responsive.

Marketing benefits

First, it allows for multiple business to advertise, to many people, at different times. Second, it is responsive in terms of only showcasing those businesses relevant to that area. There’s little point advertising a shop few in the immediate vicinity would know about or travel to. The whole point is the ad is quick, sudden and relevant: key qualities for effective advertising.

Lacuna Digital, the company behind this, wants to reward cyclists by virtue of the distance they’ve travelled.

Naturally, Lacuna Digital benefits by widening their area of effect for their service. This means more clients will use them. Cyclists, on the other hand, benefit in two ways. They benefit by earning and are incentivised to cycle further. This means they’re paid to be healthier.

All shops can be advertised. Whether it’s bicycle shops or clothes stores. Ideally, each one will prove relevant to the people around the cyclist.

Why unique marketing matters

Marketing is always about trying to convey an idea in a way that, ideally, generates a response. Whether it’s to sell a product or service, we want people to remember us. We want to be the company they think of when they require a particular service or product.

Given how crowded every industry is, however, this can be difficult. Sometimes we’re going up against giant corporations, who have long established themselves as the go-to places for various products. For example, few would consider buying MP3 players or laptops not created by Apple.

Eventually, we would like brand loyalty to do the heavy lifting marketing attempts. Until then, we need to be smart about precisely how we advertise.

A crowded market means either only the giant stand out or gazing at a sea of similar looking offers. Coca-Cola, for example, has begun marketing itself with heart-pulling adverts with universal appeal. They want to associate feelings of joy with their product and have done so successfully for some time. A marketing company, Jane St., used the power of humour, YouTube and women’s issues to create a hilarious ad campaign mocking themselves and others in the industry.

Many will still remember these, even if they never use the product or services.

Thinking outside the box isn’t just a good idea for marketing, but essential. While we can’t all encourage healthy living, like bike advertisements, we can follow that example and be unique.

The place of PR in 2016

Negotiating the world in 2016 is a difficult one for many, especially businesses – the enormous strides we’ve made in terms of technology and culture, the continued way everyone is becoming connected, all have a great impact on how businesses are treated and viewed.

For example, it’s now no longer possible for businesses to ignore the impact and importance of social media – in an age where Facebook has 1.23 billion active users, and where serious analysts believe social media is taking over traditional news sites. This has meant that those who deal with public relations have had to reassess what precisely that means.

Indeed, some view public relations as the solution to ongoing, interactive and somewhat user-controlled environment of marketing. Writing in Advertising Age, Lindsay Stein notes:

“Public relations has always played its part in the marketing mix, even if it was added to plans late and rarely recognized like other disciplines. But the emergence of skippable, blockable, opt-out-able advertising, not to mention ever-more integrated campaigns, means PR can suddenly demand more than a supporting role—and maybe even take center stage.”

The more people have control over their own media, the more it’s meant that businesses have had to be smarter about how they present themselves. Users can ignore or block several aspects of marketing. What businesses have tried to do is create alternative focus for engagement: for example, creating content users themselves will seek out and share with their friends.

Yet, PR still has the opportunity to take the lead, as many public relations courses will tell you – especially as per social media use. As Fortune Magazine highlighted:

“social media offers hope for building better relationships between PRs and the people they need to work with. Rather than blindly pitching thousands of people hoping for a 1% response rate, public relations pros can deeply research and build strong relationships with the journalists most likely to be interested in the companies they represent.”

Rather than it being an inhibitor for creating visibility and positive association with your company, you can use social media as a tool to reach and learn about those who can do well by your business.

PR is also a fascinating field due to it constantly changing and having to keep pace with technology; this means it’s an ever-green field ripe for creativity and for those looking to have their artistic and writing talents put to the test.

PR tactics to avoid

No matter how good your business might be in producing a service or product, bad publicity can ruin it regardless. Negotiating the perception of your company is precisely what public relations is about; how do you look in the eye of the public, what comes across and so forth. Ideally, PR would simply be a window into your already effective business – and you would be making sales based on your skills as a business alone. This benefits both PR and you as a business owner, since it’s an ideal to constantly aim for and a vision to keep in your mind’s eye.

But sometimes, promotion will either be detrimental or ineffective. For example, when contacting journalists to provide a story, too often PR people will provide the wrong details, withhold information and do a multitude of other things that simply frustrate the process – journalists are busy and bombarded by many other people. If you don’t make the process as smooth as possible, you will have a higher chance of losing the journalist’s interest and therefore promotion of your company.

CyberAlert spoke to journalists about what irritates them the most – which means what will make the journalists simply give up – and they noted:

“Reporters dislike receiving a pitch on a story they just covered or one just covered by a colleague or competitor.  They may write about the same topic or industry again, but surely won’t report the same angle anytime soon. They are also unlikely to feature your company strongly again, in order to maintain independence, balance and avoid being labeled as a shill.”

The biggest tool for marketing has, of course, been the viral nature of the internet. Yet, as Lori Turner-Wilson, CEO/Founder of sales training and marketing firm RedRover, notes:

“You simply can’t control the viral nature of a campaign, as the stars must be perfectly aligned and many of those stars are far outside of your control. Sure, it is gratifying when you see your work picking up viral steam, but avoid setting out with that in mind or you may lose sight of what matters most – the delivery of valuable, relevant content to your target market.”

Often, businesses lack knowledge about how precisely to promote themselves. It is highly beneficial to hire professionals, people who are knowledgeable about the fickle nature of PR, who’ve done public relations courses. By failing to use professionals, business chance making these blunders more so than ineffective PR firms.