Tag Archives: internet

What businesses must know about access control in 2017

Businesses have had to expand and change their operations in dramatic ways in 2016. No one could’ve predicted the various major global shifts that upended the markets. Donald Trump became President-Elect of the United States, troubling many people over the world due to his lack of experience, his horrendous proclamations and his incomprehensible statements. Many did not believe such a person would ever find themselves in the White House. Similarly, no one believed that the British referendum concerning Britain leaving the European Union would be an issue – and, yet, the majority of voters (51.9%) opted to leave (resulting in what’s now known as Brexit). All this has radically changed foreign investment and how businesses will now interact with businesses in these two regions. But another issue has radically made businesses rethink their approach to operations: cybersecurity. Combining all of these has meant that businesses are now approaching 2017 in a new light and it’s worth considering what this means.

Why cybersecurity became a threat in 2016

According to American intelligence agencies, there is little doubt Russian hackers affected the recent US Presidential Election. As Reuters reports:

“James Clapper, the director of national intelligence, said he had a very high level of confidence that Russia hacked Democratic Party and campaign staff email, and disseminated propaganda and fake news aimed at the Nov. 8 election.”

This comes in light of various high level security agencies finding themselves vulnerable to attacks from foreign operators. Indeed, even as high a level as the Joint Chiefs were the victims of hackers, who got into their database.

But it wasn’t only state departments and the military that were targeted. Major corporations like Sony and Yahoo were the targets of various breaches. For Sony, this meant private documents and photographs were released, especially of celebrities. Yahoo found its users’ details were open for theft, which could’ve resulted in identity theft given how little is required to carry out such a crime.

Businesses began taking more aggressive steps to protect themselves and their business. In offices around the world, the password policy began changing – new, improved ways to create a password were used instead of basic, easy-to-hack alternatives.

Cybersecurity ties into bigger concerns about security in general. As Small Business Computing notes:

“A recent study on cloud security—conducted by Forrester Consulting and commissioned by Alert Logic—found that nearly 80 percent of participants saw value in outside security expertise to supplement their security operations. Market-leading security technologies are critical but the best approach to keeping sensitive data—both yours and your customers’—secure, involves a ‘products and services’ approach. This combines cybersecurity technologies with 24×7 security-monitoring by a team of security and compliance experts.”

This itself ties into access control.

What is access control?

People should not have access to everything, at all times, everywhere. Whether it’s because you need to limit customers’ access to stock or not allow staff to use certain data, access control is essential for business.

Various physical barriers are already used often by businesses, such as with man traps. This is, as the name highlights, restricting of individual’s movements. It’s an entire physical barrier that stops people moving into certain areas. As Data Center Journal summarises:

“This “trap” enables security – whether a system or an employee – to verify the credentials of the entrant and either allow access or trigger alerts indicating an unauthorized entry attempt. Mantraps, which are sometimes called security vestibules, are small rooms with two or more doors. Authentication procedures may be required either at just the door to the secure area or at all doors.”

The most common version is simply using two doors, within the secure space. The first door allows a person to enter, then once closed, allows security verification. Then the second door can open once the first is closed and the person has been cleared. This helps slow down entrance into a secure area and ascertains the person is allowed to enter.  

This goes further when you focus on the digital sphere. As Tech Target notes:

“Access control is a security technique that can be used to regulate who or what can view or use resources in a computing environment. There are two main types of access control: physical and logical. Physical access control limits access to campuses, buildings, rooms and physical IT assets. Logical access limits connections to computer networks, system files and data.”

Cybersecurity doesn’t only involve the digital sphere. Physical access itself has ramifications on this. To that end, restricting physical access is also essential. By acting in these aggressive ways, businesses can better prepare themselves for the coming year and a whole host of new dangers it will present. If hackers are targeting the highest offices in America, their biggest, most tech savvy corporations, you can bet they won’t relent when it comes to ordinary people. Considering the average person also loses out when businesses fail, everyone benefits from having increased security measures.

Main secrets for businesses to exist online successfully

The modern business must exist online. Businesses that don’t do so are doomed to obscurity and invisibility. Even on the African continent, the widespread adoption of smart mobile devices means more people are using the internet on a daily basis. But existing online is one part of a major marketing move requiring its own focus. Let’s consider some important aspects to having a digital presence in today’s world.

Why existing online matters

As indicated, the idea of the internet only being accessible to rich countries is undermined by facts. HTXT summarised a recent report about African internet usage, which showed: “Global active internet usage grew 10% in 2016, adding 332 million more users, while Africa saw 42.7 million more active users being added.”

Mobile devices are, of course, the most frequently used. What this indicates is that if we run a business, even in Africa, we need to care about existing online – there are literally billions who will have access to our sites. They will be searching for information and the websites we control should be the first place they land (not our opposition or social media complaints).

How to make this happen

In order to drive people to our sites, we need to select a number of aspects. One of the first is to get the right domain. While people won’t check on the domain owner, usually, there are other aspects to consider.  

To choose the right domain, we should align it with our brand. Sometimes, our name will be so broad, it might already be taken. We can check the domain owner and attempt to purchase it from them, but we should rather opt to choose alternatives. Search engine optimisers who work to promote businesses online suggest choosing as close as possible to the brand itself.

Consistency is also key. We must maintain the same colours, themes, styles, logos and so on from the physical world into the digital. This continuity is important to convey to potential clients we are a serious business.

Another issue when it comes to maintaining a website is that we need new content, making it more visible to Google searches. Google is able to indicate how relevant content is as well as duplicates – so we need fresh, unique copy. This tells Google – and therefore its users – that the site is receiving attention, is worth seeing and remains relevant to what the business focuses on.

Will the internet destroy traditional forms of information gathering?

Some of the biggest names in the world today emerged as a direct result of the Internet. For example, one of the most popular videos on YouTube “Gangnam Style” has been seen 2,092,676,383; the creator, Psy, has travelled the world and been received with lavish praise. The young popstar Justin Bieber emerged as a direct result of the same site. There’s little doubt it’s aided careers of performers all over the world to break into industries and accelerate their popularity.

The internet has of course changed various dynamics in how we get careers. Aside from world famous celebrities, many people are taking courses in subjects they either couldn’t or would never have thought of; the barriers to knowledge are mostly dropped as vast swathes of information are freely available for consumption. Everything from WikiPedia to the Guardian is available to read online.

Online learning has also taken off. Of course, many are not legitimate enterprises so it’s necessary to take stock of which ones are real and accredited, and which are not.

Many things can be done online, including various kinds of trading as seen with sites like Mirrovest. We can shop for our groceries and have them delivered to our door from accredited stores. We communicate and debate and laugh, we watch films and play games and investigate foreign countries – all from the comfort of monitors.

Many people might think this is detrimental to experiencing life itself. After all, looking at the sea from a monitor versus being at the beach are two different experiences. Falling to earth from outer space versus watching a Go-Pro of someone doing it are two different things.

The question is whether this is a difference in degree or kind.

Degree and not kind

Before the internet, did there exist a format where we experienced adventures, foreign lands, strange people, without ever leaving? Was there a way for us to communicate our opinions and ideas without engaging with them directly? Of course: that’s what books and letters were for.

Newspapers have been around for hundreds of years, conveying information from foreign places and about distant events. Again: people have not been directly involved in events they knew about and had an opinion about for ages.

The Internet does only one thing differently: it conveys things in real time (and notifies you). But being instant is the only way it is different in kind, rather than degree. Otherwise, the Internet is not particularly unique in how we as a species have engaged in information.

This means any concerns about how we learn and think and market, about how we advertise and distribute knowledge isn’t unique to the Internet. People have always had to think about the medium of communication. The Internet is simply the latest medium in a long, ever-growing list of forms we’ve communicated.

(Image credit: Rock1997 / Wikipedia)

How is Your Hotel’s Conference Room Doing?

If you started reading this article, there is a high probability that people aren’t falling over themselves to make bookings. You’re looking for answers as to why not. Could it be that the croissants aren’t soft enough? Is the room too cold? It could be something this simple…

Or could it be because you’re not marketing the venue properly?

If potential clients don’t know that the hotel has a conference room or meeting venue, it won’t matter how great the food or perfect the conditions are – because they won’t come.

Here is how to get more bookings, more often:

Go to where the clients are

The first order of business is to find potential clients. The most logical place to start would be businesses in the area. Then find out which magazines they read and where they spend their lunch hours. Your advertising efforts should be concentrated around these three areas.

Secondly, approach events planners known for organising conferences and speak to PA’s. Offer to take them on a tour of the venue. This will establish a relationship and give them the opportunity to see the facilities for themselves. Nothing else will give them a better feel for the venue.

Harness the power of the internet

Create a page on your website dedicated to the conference and meeting venue. It should be easy to find and ideally it should be possible to reach it with one click from the homepage.

Once the page is up and running, get a professional to write a short article about the venue to submit to other websites. These could be industry specific or related to tourism (to snag international clientele).

Lastly, get the venue listed on local conference venue directories. This is an extremely cost-effective way to create awareness of your hotel and its conference and meeting rooms.

Please take note that you should include all available and appropriate information in the advertising. This would be the hotel’s address, the rates, the facilities on offer and the room’s capacity. Provide contact details as well so that people can easily get hold of you if they have questions.

It is of course not enough to get delegates to your hotel, it’s even more important that they return. You can achieve this with the following strategies:

  • Competent staff: Conference attendees should want for nothing on the day, from arrival to departure. By making only your best staff available, expectations can be met and exceeded.
  • Testimonials: Request testimonials from clientele and publish them on your website. In doing so, anyone that visits the hotel’s website would be able to see that others have had great experiences. This would make anyone more likely to make a booking.
  • Discounts: Offer discounts for big groups or for booking another conference within a specified timeframe. Referral discounts work well too and will get the hotel’s name out there.

Business should pick up with all of these marketing and retention strategies put in place. But if it doesn’t, perhaps the problem is the croissants after all.